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Completed Doctoral Disserations/Masters Theses 

Title:

Servant leadership qualities of principals, organizational climate, and student achievement: A correlational study

Author(s):

Lambert, Wendy Ecklund

Degree:

Ed.D

Year:

2004

Pages:

00098

Institution:

Nova Southeastern University; 1191

Advisor:

Adviser Anthony Pellegrini

Source:

DAI, 66, no. 02A (2004): p. 430

Standard No:

ISBN: 0-542-01051-8

Abstract:

This applied dissertation was designed to investigate secondary school leadership vis-a-vis school climate and student learning outcomes to ascertain whether there were correlations between servant leadership behaviors and attitudes of principals and the overall success of their schools, as measured by student achievement on standardized tests.  The correlation between principals' servant leadership attributes and overall school climate was also examined.  Secondary school principals and their faculties drawn from Florida school districts were surveyed, and the results were analyzed, both as a whole and controlling for socioeconomic status.

Analysis of the data revealed a significant relationship between servant leadership of secondary school principals and gains in student achievement.  An even stronger relationship was shown to exist between servant leadership and school climate.  Further, when controlling for socioeconomic status, school climate correlated strongly with student schievement in lower socioeconomic schools.

  SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor:

EDUCATION, ADMINISTRATION 
EDUCATION, SECONDARY 

Accession No:

AAI3165799

Database:

Dissertations

 


 

Title:

Servant-leadership and job satisfaction: A correlational study in Texas Education Agency Region X public schools

Author(s):
Miears, Larry D.
903-455-7763
4023 Western Circle, Greenville, TX, 75401
Degree:
Ed.D.
Year:
2004
Pages:
00112
Institution:
Texas A&M University - Commerce; 1287
Advisor:
Adviser Edward Seifert
Source:
DAI, 65, no. 09A (2004): p. 3237
Standard No:
ISBN: 0-496-07704-X
Abstract:
Purpose. The purpose of this study was twofold. The first was to establish that the Organizational Leadership Assessment-Educational Version (Laub, 1999) survey instrument is a useful tool for measuring the level of servant-leadership and job satisfaction in a public school organization. The second was to examine the link between the level of servant-leadership perceived and the level of job satisfaction felt in the public school organization.

Procedure. This was a correlational study using two variables of interest: the level of servant-leadership present within a public school organization, and the level of job satisfaction felt by the teaching professionals within a public school organization. A random sample of teaching professionals in Texas Education Agency Region X public schools was invited to participate by completing the survey instrument on-line.

Results. The internal reliability of the research instrument using the Cronbach's Alpha was .98 indicating that it is highly probable that differences in responses were due to differences in individual respondents opinions rather than hard to interpret or vague questions. The Pearson correlation statistic revealed that a strong positive correlation, r = .723 (p < .01, two tailed), exists between servant-leadership and job satisfaction, which means that respondents who perceived a high level of servant-leadership in their school organization indicated more satisfaction with their job. The ANOVA test and regression models used to examine the data more closely verified this finding.

Conclusions. The Organization Leadership Assessment-Education Version (Laub, 1999) shows the same strong internal reliability as the original version of the survey instrument. Researchers can use this instrument with confidence that it will accurately measure the level of servant-leadership within a school organization as well as the job satisfaction felt by those in the organization. While not in the scope of this study, the OLA could be used by school leaders to assess their entire organization. Evidence suggests that teaching professionals respond well to the style of leadership characterized as servant-leadership. The finding that teaching professionals are more satisfied with their jobs when they perceive a high level of servant-leadership has implications concerning teacher retention.
 
SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor:
EDUCATION, ADMINISTRATION 
PSYCHOLOGY, INDUSTRIAL 
Accession No:
AAI3148083
Database:
Dissertations
 

 


 

Title: A correlational analysis of servant leadership and job satisfaction in a religious educational organization
Author(s): Anderson, Kelly Preston
Degree: D.M.
Year: 2005
Pages: 00146
Institution: University of Phoenix; 0850
Advisor: Adviser Richard Schuttler
Source: DAI, 66, no. 01A (2005): p. 239
Standard No: ISBN: 0-496-95810-0
Abstract:

The theory of servant leadership is gaining in credibility and support. The purpose of this mixed methods research study was to determine the extent that employee job satisfaction was correlated with perceptions of servant leadership in the Church Educational System (CES) of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), a large private religious education organization headquartered in the Rocky Mountain Region. The literature review of this research demonstrates the teachings and doctrines unique to the LDS Church that promote living in harmony with the principles of servant leadership. This quantitative portion of the study used the Organizational Leadership Assessment (OLA) tool to discover a strong correlation exists between individual job satisfaction and perceptions of servant leadership. Given the high response rate from the participants of this study (78%), the results from this study may be applicable to other organizations.

click here to get the complete dissertation in pdf format

  SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, MANAGEMENT 
EDUCATION, RELIGIOUS 
PSYCHOLOGY, INDUSTRIAL 
EDUCATION, ADMINISTRATION 
Accession No: AAI3162292
Database: Dissertations

  


 

 

Title: Servant leadership and the effectiveness of teams
Author(s):

Irving, Justin A.

j-irving@bethel.edu

Instructor of Ministry Leadership - Bethel Seminary

Degree: Ph.D.
Year: 2005
Pages: 00099
Institution: Regent University; 1058
Advisor: Adviser Bruce E. Winston
Source: DAI, 66, no. 04A (2005): p. 1421
Standard No: ISBN: 0-542-09714-1
Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between servant leadership and the effectiveness of teams. While Greenleaf's (1977) seminal work on servant leadership has led to a growing body of literature surrounding the construct; up to this point, very little has been done to investigate what effect servant leadership behaviors have on the effectiveness of teams. In tight of this void in the literature, the present study sought to answer the research question: “Is there a relationship between servant leadership and team effectiveness?” by conducting an empirical study in a U.S. division of an international nonprofit organization. The data collected were gathered using three instruments: (a) The Organizational Leadership Assessment (Laub, 1999); (b) The Servant Leadership Assessment Instrument (Dennis, 2004); and (c) The Team Effectiveness Questionnaire (Larson & LaFasto, 1989). These instruments provided data around the following variables: (a) servant leadership at the organizational level; (b) job satisfaction at the individual participant level; (c) team effectiveness at the team level; and the servant leadership variables of (d) love, (e) empowerment, (f) vision, (g) humility, and (h) trust at the individual leader level. Pearson r correlation analyses were used to examine the relationship between team effectiveness and the other variables associated with servant leadership and job satisfaction. A statistically significant and positive correlation was found for each of the variables associated with servant leadership and job satisfaction when analyzed in reference to team effectiveness.

Click Here to get full disseration

 

  SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, MANAGEMENT 
Accession No: AAI3173207
Database: Dissertations

 


 

 

Title: Servant leadership in higher education: Exploring perceptions of educators and staff employed in a university setting
Author(s):

Iken, Stacie L.

ikensl@umary.edu -- 701-255-7500

Dept. of Occupational Therapy - Division of Human Performance Science -- University of Mary - 7500 University Drive, Bismarck, ND, 58504

Degree: Ph.D.
Year: 2005
Pages: 00086
Institution: The University of North Dakota; 0156
Advisor: Adviser Richard Landry
Source: DAI, 66, no. 12A (2005): p. 4317
Standard No: ISBN: 0-542-46147-1
Abstract: The purpose of this research was to determine and compare perceptions among educators and staff of the practice of servant leadership on an institution-wide basis at a private Christian university in the Midwest. Two separate studies were conducted as part of this research project. The first study examined perceptions of teaching faculty at the university. Perceptions of educators were compared across a spectrum of academic majors and for varying degrees of exposure to the servant leadership model. The second study examined perceptions of staff. Perceptions of these employees were compared across a spectrum of positions and for varying degrees of exposure to the servant leadership model. The Organizational Leadership Assessment was used to gather data about perceptions of servant leadership along seven dimensions of servant leadership: Values People, Develops People, Builds Community, Displays Authenticity, Provides Leadership, Shares Leadership, and Job Satisfaction. A total of 92 employees participated in this research. Employees represented in this sample included 33 full-time faculty, 23 corporate staff, 28 support staff, and eight administrators.

Educators agreed that servant leadership is being practiced on the campus. Job satisfaction was rated the dimension of servant leadership most highly perceived by educators. It had less of an effect on how servant leadership was displayed when including all seven dimensions of servant leadership. Results support development of programming on a university-wide basis as a method of enriching the potential for behaviors to be displayed in the specific areas of Develops People, Displays Authenticity, and Shares Leadership. Results of the study involving staff showed an average agreement that servant leadership is being practiced on the campus. Staff perceived a need to further Develop People. Staff also perceived a need to further develop skills in Shares Leadership. Results from these studies indicated that length of employment did not significantly impact perceptions of servant leadership.

Results of this research suggest that servant leadership is perceivable and can be measured by members of an organization. However, professional development opportunities requiring collaboration and relationship building would potentially enhance further development in dimensions of servant leadership.

  SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: EDUCATION, HIGHER 
Accession No: AAI3199527
Database: Dissertations

 


 

 
Title: Can Servant-Leaders be Safety Indicators? Development and Test of a Model Linking Servant-Leadership to Occupational Safety
Author(s):

Krebs, Kristen D.

Kris10krebs@hotmail.com

Degree: Ph.D.
Year: 2005
Pages:  
Institution: DePaul University
Advisor: Dr. Jane Halpert
Source:  
Standard No: ISBN:
Abstract:
This study addressed whether the existence of servant-leadership (Greenleaf, 1977) in an organization can act as a safety indicator by influencing individuals’ propensity to actively care for safety (Gellar, 1991). Specifically, this research examined whether the presence of servant-leadership would shape psychological states of employees in a way that promotes engagement in safe behaviors. In addition, this study examined how both servant-leadership and actively caring would influence occupational safety outcomes (e.g., accidents and near misses) in an applied setting.
     Participants were 230 male and female sales representatives and district managers in a large pharmaceutical organization.    A cross-sectional survey research design was employed to assess perceptions of servant-leadership and actively caring, as well as to obtain self-reported safety data. 
     Results indicated that servant leadership is predictive of actively caring and each of its three components (i.e., belief that people should actively care, willingness to actively care and engagement in actively caring behaviors), and some items from the servant-leadership and actively caring scales also appeared to predict accidents and near misses. No support was found for the hypothesis that near misses would predict accidents. Finally, some support was found for a proposed path model in which propensity to actively care for safety mediated the relationship between servant-leadership and near misses, and servant-leadership significantly influenced accidents directly. 
     Researchers are encouraged to take these findings into consideration when developing future research studies and future research to replicate these findings is suggested. In addition, management in organizations is encouraged to consider incorporating servant-leadership into their corporate leadership model as well as the organizational factors and initiatives that support that model (e.g., leadership performance assessment, reward programs, corporate communications). Finally, safety personnel in organizations are encouraged to consider leadership as a safety indicator and to take these findings into account when developing safety communications, programs, training and interventions. 
 
  SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor:  
Accession No:  
Database:  

 


 

Title: Servant leadership: A quantitative study of the perceptions of employees of a Christian-based, for-profit organization
Author(s): Arfsten, Debra J.
Degree: Ph.D.
Year: 2006
Pages: 00107
Institution: Colorado State University; 0053
Advisor: Adviser Clifford P. Harbour
Source: DAI, 67, no. 07A (2006): p. 2397
Standard No: ISBN: 978-0-542-80225-6
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to collect and analyze data from individuals employed at a Christian-based, for-profit organization to determine their perceptions of the presence of servant leadership characteristics at the organization. The Organizational Leadership Assessment (OLA), developed by Laub (1999), was used in this study and a total of 262 surveys were returned for data analysis. The OLA was based on Laub's operational definition and six constructs of servant leadership which are valuing people, developing people, building community, displaying authenticity, providing leadership, and sharing leadership.

Data were analyzed based on gender, number of years at the organization, and level of employment. Results showed there were no significant differences on any of the constructs for the levels of gender and number of years at the organization. Results also showed that there were no significant differences in the level of employment for the constructs of valuing people, developing people, building community, and displaying authenticity. However, significant differences were found in the level of employment for the constructs of providing leadership and sharing leadership.

Results of the study indicated servant leadership characteristics were evident at some levels of the organization but were not evident throughout the entire organization. According to Laub's constructs and score sheet, this organization would not be considered a servant organization.

  SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, MANAGEMENT 
EDUCATION, ADMINISTRATION 
EDUCATION, RELIGIOUS 
Accession No: AAI3226110
Database: Dissertations

 


 

 

Title: Stepping out of the shadow: The leadership qualities of successors in family business
Author(s):

Cater, John James, III

E.J. Ourso College of Business Administration - Rucks Department of Management - Louisiana State University

Degree: Ph.D.
Year: 2006
Pages: 00291
Institution: Louisiana State University and Agricultural & Mechanical College; 0107
Advisor: Adviser Robert T. Justis
Source: DAI, 67, no. 08A (2006): p. 3055
Standard No: ISBN: 978-0-542-81115-9
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to better understand the development of successors in the family business and their approach to the leadership of the firm. Foundational concepts in the family business literature and leadership literature are reviewed. I propose an integration of leadership theory into family business studies. I examine the reasons successors join the family business, the development of successors from follower to leader, differences between founders and successors, and the leadership qualities of successors. A case study approach is followed, using a mixture of qualitative interviews and a survey questionnaire, the Organizational Leadership Assessment.

Six family businesses are described in detail, including an air conditioning wholesale company, a pest control company, an automobile dealership, a printing business, a funeral home, and an air conditioning service company. Reasons for successors to enter the family business include expectation, convenience, opportunity, and closeness to family members. Successors move through the stages of student of the organization, low-level manager, top manager, and finally owner. I identify five areas of differences between founders and successors, including business environment concerns, company changes, ownership complexity, and two internal differences regarding entrepreneurial activity and business risk approach. Important leadership qualities for successors include the need for "hands-on" technical knowledge, the importance of long-term orientation, the need for a spirit of cooperation among family leaders, and the relevance of servant leadership. I offer eight propositions that deal with encouraging the next generation to join the business, five propositions that address the development of successors, two propositions regarding the differences between successors and founders, and two propositions that deal with the leadership qualities of successors.

  SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, MANAGEMENT 
SOCIOLOGY, INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY STUDIES 
Accession No: AAI3229207
Database: Dissertations

 


 

 

Title: Called to serve: Servant-leadership perceptions at a Franciscan-sponsored university correlated with job satisfaction
Author(s): Van Tassell, Malachi
Degree: Ph.D.
Year: 2006
Pages: 00108
Institution: Capella University; 1351
Advisor: Adviser James Cook
Source: DAI, 67, no. 08A (2006): p. 2843
Standard No: ISBN: 978-0-542-81263-7
Abstract: The call to serve is an important dimension of Franciscan leadership. This study sought to determine to what extent, if any, servant-leadership is perceived at a Franciscan-sponsored university. In February, 2006, Laub's (1999) Organizational Leadership Assessment (OLA) and Bowling Green University's (1997) Job Descriptive Index (JDI) were administered to the staff of a liberal-arts, private, Franciscan-sponsored university to measure servant-leadership perceptions and job satisfaction. The results of the OLA were stratified by job classification as well as by division of the university. Differences in servant-leadership perceptions were found amongst the various job classifications and divisions. The results of the OLA were further correlated with the results of the Job in General (JIG) subset of the JDI to see what type of linear relationship, if any, existed. A moderate, positive linear relationship between servant-leadership perceptions and job satisfaction was found.

  SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: EDUCATION, ADMINISTRATION 
EDUCATION, RELIGIOUS 
EDUCATION, HIGHER 
Accession No: AAI3229492
Database: Dissertations

 


 

 

Title: Perceptions of the evidence of a servant leadership culture among educators in the P--12 school system in the North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists
Author(s): Ross, Donovan B.
Degree: Ph.D.
Year: 2006
Pages: 00134
Institution: Andrews University; 0443
Advisor: Adviser Hinsdale Bernard
Source: DAI, 67, no. 09A (2006): p. 3256
Standard No: ISBN: 978-0-542-87414-7
Abstract: Problem statement. The Seventh-day Adventist church has consistently advocated that adherents to this religion should be Christ-like in every aspect of their lives. They should be of service to others as they create a community of believers who are loving, kind, and considerate of others. These ideals form some of the characteristics of servant leadership. The question therefore is whether servant leadership is being practiced in the P-12 school system. No study related to the presence and practice of servant leadership in the P-12 school system of the NAD has been conducted. Research was needed to determine the perceptions of the evidence of servant leadership and the possible impact of gender, age, ethnic background, the size of the school in which the respondents worked, the gender of the principal, the respondents' level of education, the configuration of school operation, and the type of SDA teaching certification that the respondents held.

Methodology. A descriptive, explorative, cross-sectional survey was conducted. Participants in this study were selected by stratified random sampling from a population of 6,697 educators employed in the P-12 school system of the North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists. Data were collected using the Organizational Leadership Assessment and a demographic questionnaire that were mailed to 1,110 educators with a response rate of 33.4%. Two research questions and eight null hypotheses were tested. The first research question was analyzed using descriptive statistics and a comparison of means. The null hypotheses and remaining research question were tested at the .05 level of significance using one-way ANOVA.

Results. Laub contends that organizations at or above a 4.0 composite mean score on the OLA can be identified as a servant organization. The composite means of all scores on this survey was found to be 3.91 which are very close to the Laub threshold score of 4.0. This would seem to indicate that the P-12 school system of the North American Division of Seventh-day Adventists is not a fully servant organization, but instead practices a positive version of paternalistic leadership. The results also indicated that there is a difference in how educators perceive the attributes of servant leadership based on the gender of the educator as well as the enrollment and configuration of school operation in which the educator works. However, there is no difference in how educators' perceive the attributes based on age, ethnic background, gender of the principal, the educators' level of education, as well as the SDA teaching certification.

  SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, MANAGEMENT 
EDUCATION, ADMINISTRATION 
Accession No: AAI3234103
Database: Dissertations

 


 

 

Title: Servant-leadership in a Catholic charities agency: A case study
Author(s):

McCann, Robert J.

rmccann@ccspokane.org

Degree: Ph.D.
Year: 2006
Pages: 00276
Institution: Gonzaga University; 0736
Advisor: Adviser Sandra Wilson
Source: DAI, 67, no. 10A (2006): p. 3892
Standard No: ISBN: 978-0-542-93519-0
Abstract: Robert Greenleaf was a man with a vision that effective leadership begins when the leader assumes the role of leader as servant. A case study approach was used to examine the extent to which leaders, staff, and volunteers perceived the characteristics of servant-leadership to exist within a Catholic Charities social service agency. Four leaders that included the agency Executive Director and three program directors, participated in an in-depth interview process to assess beliefs about what it is to be an effective leader and to reflect on their own leadership styles within the agency.

Data analysis of three data sources using both qualitative and quantitative data analysis procedures was also used in the study. The three data sources and levels of analysis included: (a) the content analysis of the agency mission and core values statements for the presence of servant-leadership principles, (b) qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews from the agency Executive Director and three program directors, and (c) quantitative analysis of 229 staff and volunteer responses to the 60-item Organizational Leadership Assessment (OLA) developed by Laub (1999) to assess the extent that these individuals perceived servant-leadership existed within the organization.

Perceptions of the extent to which servant-leadership characteristics were present in the organization were assessed in terms of Laub's (1999) six constructs of: (a) displaying authenticity, (b) valuing others, (c) developing others, (d) building community, (e) providing leadership, and (f) sharing leadership. Agency leaders, especially the Executive Director, focused the most on characteristics associated with displaying authenticity; specifically, interacting with others in an attitude of openness and accountability, a willingness to admit personal limitations and mistakes, and a desire to learn from members at all levels of the agency. Based on the results of the OLA (Laub, 1999) survey, paid staff and volunteers perceive high levels of servant-leadership characteristics to be present among leaders at all levels of the agency.

An implication of the findings of the present case study in conjunction with other research by Laub (1999), Horsman (2001), and the anecdotal evidence provided by leaders of well known organizations is that the principles of servant-leadership can be integrated into the operations of different organizations and those organizations can be successful in fulfilling their respective missions.

  SUBJECT(S)
Descriptor: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, MANAGEMENT 
Accession No: AAI3239338
Database: Dissertations

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