Research Projects currently underway utilizing the OLA
  There are several researchers now working on research projects with the OLA. These projects are listed here so that you can be aware of the key research questions now being pursued.  We also are providing the contact information so that you will be able to contact these researchers directly to discuss their projects and how they are utilizing the OLA instrument.


Title: An Examination of the Belief and Practice of Servant Leadership among Military Leaders and a Comparative Analysis of Military and Business Leaders

Researcher:

Kegler, Michael
Type:  Dissertation
Email:  XENOPHON6@aol.com
Phone:  678-523-7943
Address:  
Institution:  Capella University
Abstract:  Given the difficult tasks that military members must accomplish, the harsh and deadly environment that military members must operate in, and the hierarchical, authoritative and paternalistic structure of the military, what is the current practice and belief of servant-leadership in the military with regard to the Laub’s Organizational Leadership Assessment (OLA)? Laub’s Organizational Leadership Assessment instrument utilizes a five-point scale to determine the degree to which an organization is servant-led. An organization that scores a 4 or above on the OLA point scale is considered to be a servant-led organization. This study will collect from current service members to determine if the military is servant-led.
Hypothesis I – the military is a servant led organization
HI0: μMilitary ≥ 4
HI1: μMilitary < 4
Hypothesis I will be tested using a 1-sample t-test (α=.05).
            Secondly, the research seeks to answer the question of how military leaders compare in their practice and belief of servant-leadership to business leaders with regard to Laub’s Organizational Leadership Assessment (OLA). There are many similarities between the military and the business environment. There are significant differences as well. How do the leaders in these two environments compare with regards to servant leadership? This study will collect OLA data on current business and military leaders and compare the results of the two groups.
Hypothesis II – the belief and practice of servant leadership among military leaders is the same as business leaders
HII0: μMilitary = µBusiness
HII1:    μMilitary ≠ µBusiness
Hypothesis II will be tested using a 2-sample t-test (α=.05).
Status:  Dissertation proposal complete - IRB approval received - now doing data collection
Completion:  

Title: Committed to Serve: A Descriptive Study of the Growing Impact of Servant Leadership within a Successful Nonprofit Organization

Researcher:

Orenthio K. Goodwin
Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Email: orenthiogoodwin@hotmail.com
Phone: 210-264-7519
Address:  
Institution:  Capella University
Abstract:  
Unlike leadership approaches with a top-down hierarchical style, servant leadership instead emphasizes collaboration, trust, empathy, and the ethical use of power. At heart, the individual is a servant first, making the conscious decision to lead in order to better serve others, not to increase their own power. The objective is to enhance the growth of individuals in the organization and increase teamwork and personal involvement.
 
This descriptive, quantitative research study will attempt to explore the existing phenomena associated with the practice and presence of servant leadership. Specifically, through this study, the researcher will survey a total of 100 randomly selected volunteers, workers, and leaders within a distinguished nonprofit organization (NPO). This population is chosen based upon their practice and high regard of servant leadership. Based upon the multi-level, employee perception, the results of this study will be used to describe the association between the presence of servant leadership and job satisfaction as it relates to organizational success.
 
Founded on Arfsten’s (2006) recommendation for future research, the data for this study will be collected while utilizing an online adaptation of Servant Organizational Leadership Assessment (SOLA) (Laub, 1999). This instrument will provide essential response data based upon Laub’s (1999) key characterizations of servant leadership: value people, develop people, build community, practice authenticity, provide leadership, and share leadership. The data will be examined based upon gender, age, tenure, and employment level.
 
As previously tested by Arfsten (2006), this study will include research questions which will explore the characterization and perception of servant leadership within a successful nonprofit organization. The characterization, based on the development of Laub’s (1999) OLA, included the impact of the following dependent variables: value people, develops people, builds community, practices authenticity, provides leadership, and shares leadership. The research questions are as follows:
 
1.      How are the characteristics of servant leadership perceived by the NPO?
2.      Do the perceptions of the servant leadership characteristics vary among the gender of the NPO?
3.      Do the perceptions of the servant leadership characteristics vary among the tenure of the employees within the NPO?
4.      Do the perceptions of the servant leadership characteristics vary among the employment level of the employees within the NPO?
5.      Does a correlation exist between the presence and practice of servant leadership characteristics and job satisfaction within the NPO?
Status:  
Completion:  Target Date - August, 2010

Title:
Organizational Health: Understanding the Impact of the CompStat Management Paradigm on Municipal Law Enforcement Organizations

Researcher:

Richard S. Freeman

Type:  Doctoral Dissertation
Email:

 freeman565@comcast.net; scott.freeman@conyersga.gov;

Phone:  678-614-5369 cell -- 770-266-1934 home
Address:  
Institution:  Walden University
Abstract:  
Summary: The CompStat management paradigm is regarded as a truly revolutionary management method for police managers that gets results by reducing crime, increasing police effectiveness, and addressing community disorder (Henry, 2002/2003). Despite the overwhelming successes of CompStat in hundreds of law enforcement organizations, CompStat has been heavily criticized for its top-down management style, reinforcement of internal bureaucratic processes, leadership by fear, and its failure to motivate officers (Eterno & Silverman, 2006).
A gap has been identified in the literature relating to the compatibility of the principles of CompStat and the characteristics of a healthy organization. This research study will fill the existing knowledge gap and has far-reaching implications for American law enforcement organizations and the communities that those organizations serve. This research has significant implications for social change relating to the improvement of America’s law enforcement organizations by balancing out the needs to control and reduce crime while also promoting the dignity, worth, value, and development of America’s law enforcement officers and the organizations in which they serve. 
 1.      How does the CompStat management model affect the organizational health of municipal law enforcement agencies?
2.      Can individual servant leadership characteristics emerge within municipal law enforcement agencies that utilize the CompStat management model?
Status:  
Completion:  November, 2010


Title: Organizational Servant-Leadership Practices: Relationship to Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment in a Faith Based Institution

Researcher:

Pabon, Hector
Type:  Masters Thesis
Email:  hlp51@verizon.net
Phone:  718-321-3935
Address:  151-17 32nd Ave. , Flushing, NY, 11354
Institution:  Nyack College
Abstract:  Chapter III: Methodology
This chapter discloses the methodology utilized to assess servant-leadership, job satisfaction and organizational commitment in the organization. The methodology should reveal a correlation between servant leadership and job satisfaction and organizational commitment. 
Research Setting and Sample
The research setting was Evangel Church in Western Queens, New York City. The church contains 400-500 congregants and approximately 65 volunteers and 10 employees. The church provides adult age and life-stage related groups on Sunday morning alongside nursery through grade twelve Sunday school classes. The church holds choir and worship team practices on Tuesday nights, Bible study and discipleship groups for all ages on Wednesdays, youth and prayer on Fridays and hosts various conferences, concerts and ministry sponsored events throughout the year. The pastor was presented with the survey topic and agreed. The volunteers and employees were asked to remain after a Sunday service to take the survey.
Selection of Organization
The church was selected because of its longevity. Evangel church has been in Western Queens for seventy five years and its present pastor has been there forty two years. The church has been housed in four locations throughout its history and has been through some extensive building projects. The church also runs a grammar school and high school with a combined population of five hundred children. Prior to the last building project, the church was holding three services on Sunday mornings for approximately 1100 congregants. Since entering the new sanctuary which seats about 1800, the number of congregants has diminished. The reasons for this are unclear. The area around the church has seen much new development with an influx of young professionals whose children are or will soon be of school age. These last two issues along with the longevity of the institution made it prime for study.
Data Collection Strategies
The employees and volunteers were provided with a letter inviting them to complete a survey on the church. The date was set for a Sunday after service with lunch provided and entertainment for the children. The results were entered into an electronic database. The data was then coded and analyzed utilizing the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). 
Instruments and Measures
The survey was somewhat lengthy and consisted of three sections with a cover page. The cover page served to allay apprehension by insuring anonymity of the respondents and providing general instructions for completion. The first section was a self reporting demographic page to obtain age, gender, years of attendance, position, role (worker, supervisor, or manager), education, employment status and ethnicity. The second section was the Organization Leadership Assessment (OLA) (Laub 1999), used by permission from Dr. James Alan Laub, its originator. The OLA is a 66 item likert scale questionnaire which tests for six aspects of organizational servant-leadership plus job satisfaction. The third and final section of the survey was the Three-Component Model (TCM) of commitment (Meyer & Allen 2002). The TCM is an 18 item likert scale questionnaire which test for three aspects of organizational commitment: affective attachment (want to stay), continuance commitment (need to stay), and normative obligation (ought to stay).
Data Analysis Plan
Once survey is complete the raw data will be processed through SPSS data analysis. Demographic data will be analyzed via frequency charts, statistical mean and median, cross tabulation and charts. The OLA and TCM findings will be correlated utilizing Pearson and ANOVA to support or deny the hypotheses. 
Status:  Chapters 1-3 are completed
Completion:  

Title: Servant Leadership Characteristics in Kentucky Schools and its Relationship to School Success

Researcher:

Woods, Larry
Type:  Doctoral Dissertation
Email:  larry.woods@butler.kyschools.us
Phone:  270-999-1121
Address:  4770 Brownsville Road, Morgantown, KY  42261
Institution:  University of Kentucky
Abstract:  This study focuses on the servant leadership qualities in schools as measured by teachers’ perceptions toward principal leadership qualities. The principals are the second greatest variable for successful schools. Today, the principals’ position must take on the transformational change from managerial to instructional leader. In relation to Rost’s (1991) definition of leadership, a principal must have an influence relationship with followers who intend real changes that reflect mutual purposes. The principal takes the dominant role to develop the influence relationships, motivate, and share mutual goals. Appropriate leadership ideology is difficult to define and implement because each school has its own specific, climate, and instruction. The literature review indicates that servant leadership may be a suggested ideology that provides a framework to accomplish the relationships and motivation needed for successful schools in a challenging society. This is a comparative study of high and low performing schools to the extent that servant leadership qualities are used. The OLA is used to determine if successful schools have influential principals with more servant leadership characteristics than principals in less successful schools. An exploratory question originating from this study is: Do principals have servant leadership characteristics/attributes? The result of this study can be related to the existing principal’s servant leadership qualities of the school. For the purpose of this study, the teachers- the followers will identify servant leadership qualities of the principal. The teachers with three years or more years experience will respond to a survey of 66 items designed to measure essential areas of servant-led school. Teachers with experience can fully identify influential relationships that describe true patterns of servant leader characteristics.
Status:  Proposal approved by committee
Completion:  

 

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